This is a very thin plastic webbing; it is not something you want to get too close to a naked flame, because it will melt. I strongly suspect that if you get droplets of hot wax on it, that it will cause stiff melted crackly bits in your rope, and that’s just not going to be pleasant for either the person tying or the person being tied. This is a very thin plastic webbing; it is not something you want to get too close to a naked flame, because it will melt. I strongly suspect that if you get droplets of hot wax on it, that it will cause stiff melted crackly bits in your rope, and that’s just not going to be pleasant for either the person tying or the person being tied. Tossa is actually a pretty tight lay, which means it needs a bit of extra conditioning or a long period of break in time before it’s really good to tie with, due to that extra stiffness. That said, spending a bit of time breaking in your rope isn’t really that onerous. Can be either scratchy or soft, depending on the conditioning process. You can almost see the scratchiness. Research your dye carefully though. Hemp Bondage Rope.

Somewhat pricey, it comes in a variety of lays (“lay” refers to how tightly it’s twisted together). The tighter the lay, the stiffer and more durable the rope tends to be. The times when I’ve felt it most likely that I would need to use safety scissors to get someone out of rope, have all been times when I’ve been using this kind of cotton rope. So if you’re going to use it, keep those EMT shears handy. But every time I’ve used it, whatever I’ve been wearing or my partner has been wearing has wound up dusted in the stuff. It also makes things more likely to be itchy, sneezy, etc.

Con: Doesn’t take dye as well. That is, the colors will be more muted, less brilliant. Bondage rope and what kind of rope is best for bondage? This is the kind of question I come across all the time on rope bondage groups and at beginners workshops. And the answer is, inevitably (drum-roll please):. Your ties may not stay in exactly the same place as you put them, riding up or down, etc. It’s not particularly aesthetic. Nylon Bondage Rope. I don’t actually own any of this stuff, because I’ve never felt the need.

Summary. In summary, cotton is pretty great for most forms of bondage other than suspension. Hemp is one of the natural fibre ropes that is commonly used for shibari. It’s generally pricier than anything synthetic, and my understanding is that it’s used a lot over in the US. Summary. In summary, cotton is pretty great for most forms of bondage other than suspension.

Con: More expensive. Pro: Less expensive. As I’ve only ever seen it in white, that means you should get a good result if you decide to go down that route. Research your dye carefully though. Goes well with the traditional shibari aesthetic; has that natural, organic kind of look. Can be either scratchy or soft, depending on the conditioning process. Again, not recommended for shibari, but everything else goes, and I’ve heard that there are actually dyes which will change the colour of nylon. As I’ve only ever seen it in white, that means you should get a good result if you decide to go down that route. That said, spending a bit of time breaking in your rope isn’t really that onerous. 5 millimetre tossa jute.